browser icon
You are using an insecure version of your web browser. Please update your browser!
Using an outdated browser makes your computer unsafe. For a safer, faster, more enjoyable user experience, please update your browser today or try a newer browser.

Ella’s 1st Flight

Posted by on October 3, 2011
Ella was only 6 weeks old when I took her on her first flight. My husband was working, so I was on my own. Walking onboard I had a backpack on my back, a breast pump over one shoulder, and a diaper bag over the other shoulder. I was carrying Ella strapped into her car seat. We used a convertible car seat (the huge ones they use up to 4 years) and not an infant carrier, so you can imagine the struggle. Not one person offered help. Business men looked at me in disgust as I (accidentally…maybe) bumped their elbows and shoulders on my way back to my seat.

We fly often and Ella earned elite status on our primary airline when she was only 20 months old. I only cried 4 times in that 1st year and a half of travel with her. (joke) Through our frequent travel and my observations as a flight attendant for 12 years, I have collected many tips and tools on making traveling with kids a little bit easier.

Hopefully you experience more kindness from strangers than I did on that first flight. On our second flight at least 5 people offered assistance. I would help you if I saw you struggling. But I am sharing these tips so you won’t need to depend on others. So you can be self-sufficient when traveling with your kids and so you can eliminate as much as possible the stress of traveling with kids.

The best thing about travel with infants is they sleep a lot!

                             

Facebooktwitterinstagram

2 Responses to Ella’s 1st Flight

  1. Catherine Heyres

    Haha, I like “accidentally….maybe”. I guess people who don’t have kids just don’t understand…. Your blog is great, looking forward to more tips and stories 🙂

  2. Cloud Surfing With Kids (Surviving air travel with children)

    Thank you! It doesn’t bother me if people are oblivious to what help a parent may need. It’s when they see an obvious need and choose to ignore it that I’m bothered. I’ll share a story of a passenger refusing to help me by carrying just my smoothie to my seat when I was carrying the car seat, etc. myself. Stay tuned….

Leave a Reply